137 Comments

Your Yearly Reminder: It’s Just Practice

| July 30th, 2018

It happens every year.

Fans obsessively follow every training camp practice and get overly excited when they hear that guys from their team look really good. Or conversely get worried upon hearing somebody is struggling.

This is your friendly, annual reminder to calm down. The first few days of training camp ultimately don’t mean a ton, especially when it comes to rumors about how particular players are performing. Let’s take a look at a few of the reasons why hearing about a single practice, taking place over a month before the season starts, is not really going to tell you much about the season.


Single Examples

How often do you hear somebody say “This player looked great today,” using one big play he made as proof? Unfortunately, this blatantly ignores the consistency required from players to truly perform at a high level.

To go along with this is the problem of contrasting reports. One person will say a player looks great based on one or two flashy plays, while another person claims that same player is doing terrible because he had one bad miscue. Fans will naturally want to gravitate towards the positive reports, but balance is key.

Recent example: New kicker Cody Parkey made some long field goals, but also had a few misses. One reporter explained that all the misses came with the 2nd team holder, while another decided Parkey had a “shaky day.”


Looking Good or Looking Bad?

Another thing to keep in mind is that players are going up against their teammates in training camp, so somebody “looking good” could mean more that their teammate is bad. For example, hearing that the offensive line is consistently dominating their defensive counterparts in practice can be viewed two ways.  On the one hand, the offensive line is looking really good.  On the other hand, the defensive line is being outclassed. Does that say more good things about the offensive line or bad things about the defensive line?

This happened in 2014, when the defense drew praise throughout training camp for holding their own against the offense, which had finished as the 2nd highest scoring unit in the NFL the year before.  Everybody thought this meant good things for the defense, when in fact the opposite was true.  The defense was still among the worst in the NFL, while the offense plummeted from 2nd to 23rd in points scored.

Recent example: Chicago’s secondary has been drawing rave reviews from camp so far. Does that say good things about them or bad things about the new-look WR group?


Context is Key

It is also essential to remember who players are going up against when evaluating their play. A wide receiver making training camp plays against the third string defense — where many of the prospects probably won’t make the team — doesn’t mean he’ll be able to make plays against starting defenses in September. Having a young reserve look good against other reserves is promising in that it might mean the player is ready to test himself against better competition, but don’t go overboard in thinking it means much more than that.

Remember Tanner Gentry last year? He was the talk of training camp after repeatedly burning third string defensive backs and winning contested catches downfield. Everybody was worried he would be claimed by another team when the Bears cut him at the start of the year, but he easily ended up on their practice squad. When he actually got into NFL games later in the season, he was a complete non-factor. It turns out performing against third string cornerbacks in practice isn’t the same as beating starters in real games.

Recent example: Kevin Toliver was the talk of early camp after having three interceptions through two practices. He was catching balls thrown by Chase Daniel and Tyler Bray. This isn’t to say that Toliver can’t be a good NFL player, but perhaps we should wait to see him against other NFL players before building his shrine in Canton.


Not Real Football

Finally, the most important thing to keep in mind is that training camp is not real football.

Most of the practices do not allow tackling, and some even take place without pads on. It’s easy for a quarterback to step up in the pocket and confidently make a throw when he knows he’s not going to get drilled, but that doesn’t mean he’ll be able to make the same play in a real situation when a pass rusher is bearing down on him. Running backs look good when they keep running and people can’t tackle them. Receivers have an easier time making tough catches in traffic when a safety isn’t coming to separate them from the ball with a big hit.

And don’t even get me started on the defense. It’s extremely difficult to judge a linebacker — whose primary job is to make tackles — when he can’t tackle anyone. Sure, you can say that he is consistently in the right position to make a play, but you don’t know whether he actually will make that play. Likewise, linemen on both sides of the ball are very tough to judge in practices that limit contact, as virtually everything they do relies on contact.

Recent example: Toliver’s aforementioned big days came on two practices where players weren’t even wearing pads. He’s been injured and unable to participate since then.


Conclusion

Don’t overreact to what you hear from training camp practices.

I know it’s tempting to want to over-analyze everything, especially after football has been gone for so long, but that will not do you any favors in the long run.

This is not to say that these practices are meaningless.

On the contrary, they are an important way for young players to get reps and for offenses and defenses to develop cohesion. But secondhand reports about them, or even firsthand experiences viewing them, are not always the best indicator of things to come. So let’s all agree to at least wait until preseason games to convince ourselves that our favorite lesser player has used the offseason to turn himself into a star.

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  • SC Dave

    “It is also essential to remember who players are going up against when evaluating their play. A wide receiver making training camp plays against the third string defense — where many of the prospects probably won’t make the team — doesn’t mean he’ll be able to make plays against starting defenses in September.”

    Sort of like all the gushing over a certain draftee throwing passes against 4th stringers last preseason?

  • Conclusion. Calm yo tits!

  • Artoo

    My favorite training camp player that always looked like he was going to have a breakout season was Devin Hester. Always

  • Big Mike

    The best way to view training camp is live. Watching the 1 on 1 drills and evaluating technique. The scrimmages, same thing.

    • Jeff should send you over so you can give us the deets on how the oline and HH look.

      Though I suppose w out pads, not much to write home about

      • Big Mike

        You can tell a lot from 1 on 1 drills, hands, feet, hips especially if guys are competing one after the other. Although at the NFL level, distinguishing bad, ok, good and great technique probably requires film study. Those guys are all good.

        Some of the more obvious tells are usually kick out drills for tackles, how fast can they reset their feet in pass pro, and for the interior guys how fast are their hands.

        • Should join Data and the crew one of the practices. If I lived in Chicago, I totally would.
          Coward is the converted Dlinemen . curious to see how he stacks up vs the others

    • The OL and DL drills were all too far from me to see anything on Saturday, but TEs did blocking drills right in front of me. Shaheen’s lateral movement was awful. Other TEs going half speed got right around him every time they did the slightest change of direction.

      • Big Mike

        Nice insight. Was this a pass protection drill? Honest to god, I wouldn’t know where to look, so many things I’d like to see. Drills, how coaches teach, how the drills are set up, etc. Even at a Varsity HS practice, you have to pick and choose what you want to watch. Even then, without insight from the coach running the drill/scrimmage you are guessing a bit at the objective of each drill. TE on TE sounds like a warm up.

        • Pass protection. They had one TE lined up like he was on the end of the OL, and another opposite him in a three point stance out wide, like a nine technique. Rushing in slow motion just to go through footwork and hand placement.

          Shaheen had a really hard time mirroring with his feet when the TE would dip back inside. The coach worked on it with him after every rep, but it never got better from what I could tell.

          • Big Mike

            That’s basic stuff, but a TE should never be 1 on 1 with a 9, without inside help.

      • Irish Sweetness

        If there’s one bust on this team it’s Shaheen. Kev will have his day. But Shaheen ….

        • “Modestly” Huge Bears Penis

          I bet he catches 5+ TDs this year. Is that still a bust?

  • Bobby Douglass

    We talkin’ about *practice*?

  • Scharfinator
    • I know we’re supposed to hate the Puke more, but something about that team just grinds me.

      • leftcoastdave

        “America’s Team” sticks in my craw and I hated them before they even started that boast.

        • SC Dave

          That “America’s Team” bullshit is when I started hating them.

  • willbest

    TL;DR. Sky. Is. Falling. End. Is. Nigh.

  • AlbertInTucson

    “…It’s just practice.”

    No, it practice without your #1 draft pick in camp.

    https://www.saturdaydownsouth.com/georgia-football/roquan-smith-bears-contract-dispute-2018/

    • “Modestly” Huge Bears Penis

      Someone should give Jay a call and see if he is willing to play LB.

      • AlbertInTucson

        You want an ex-Bear Qb to play LB, you call Bobby Douglass.

        • John F

          or McMahon (although he wouldn’t last one play)

        • “Modestly” Huge Bears Penis

          Isn’t he like 70 with dementia?

          • JAB

            There was an interesting segment done on McMahon (ESPN I think) about how he had some procedure done on his spinal column to allow more fluid into his brain. I guess that helped his headaches and stopped the continuation of dementia. I’d like to see if that’s still working for him. It was sad to see how messed up he was.

          • SC Dave

            I assume you mean progression of dementia

          • John F

            The problem was spinal fluid caught in his head and was essentially polluting his brain. When the doctors aligned his neck vertebrae the fluid drained out and back into the spinal column where it belonged (he has to continue to get cervical alignments).

            McMahon said it felt like a toilet flushing, he could literally feel the fluid flowing out of his brain. Unfortunately that fluid had been caught in there for a long time and it was probably doing damage for a while. Thankfully, he is doing better with these treatments.

          • JAB

            It’s been a couple years or more since I saw the segment. Thanks for clearing up the procedure

          • Irish Sweetness

            That was a great piece. He was totally blocked up, and now it’s okay. The headaches were making him suicidal.

          • JAB

            I’m glad someone else saw it.

          • AlbertInTucson

            I hadn’t heard that Bobby was having THAT issue.

            His Wiki page doesn’t mention anything like that.

            Just that he was once married to a former Playmate Model and was arrested for trespassing in 2011.

          • “Modestly” Huge Bears Penis

            just an assumption.

    • The cheap Bears are back!
      Seems stupid not to protect Roq from a potentially arbitrary rule.

      Also, if Roq has to consider making “business decisions” before making tackles, that might hinder his play and aggrresiveness.

    • KentuckyBearsFan

      The season has already started: LAWYERS vs. LAWYERS.

  • Notable FAs. No pass rushers, as expected. Junior Gallette is an OLB with 3 sacks last yr, but he’s 30, and not sure if he’s much better than Acho

    Dez Bryant
    Bashaud Breeland
    Johnathan Hankins
    Eric Reid
    Kenny Vaccaro
    Junior Galette
    Antonio Gates
    Eric Decker
    Jeremy Maclin
    NaVorro Bowman
    Mike Mitchell
    DRC
    Robert Ayers
    Julius Thomas
    Kayvon Webster
    TJ Ward
    Orleans Darkwa
    Brian Cushing
    Alfred Morris

    • evantonio

      Eric Reid would be nice.

      • Isn’t Bowman even at 80s yr old still better than Kwiat? But, he’s not playing specials.
        Surprised at some of the names like Breeland.
        Hankins is a solid NT I think
        I don’t know what’s up with Vaccaro. He’s had a very up and down career. Was a top 15 pick once upon a time.
        wow, could’ve used Dez last yr, but he comes with some diva.

      • AlbertInTucson

        The Cards just signed a safety and it wasn’t Reid, it was Tre Boston but, they were looking for a #3 safety.

    • AlbertInTucson

      Dez Bryant.

      Yeah, we want a guy like THAT in Trubisky’s ear.

      (Sarcasm).

  • KentuckyBearsFan

    Hey Data,

    I know we’re all getting jacked for the first preseason game…which we all know means nothing.

    Is there any correlation – at all – with preseason results and seasonal record? Or just the first preseason game? Or last preseason game?

    (this is too stupid of an analysis to perform, so it’s not really worth your time….but maybe somebody did this study already?)

    • Lions went 4-0 in their defeated season
      Bears went 1-3 in 85

      We’re all a bunch of drama queens. Compared to the 85 PS, this team is golden right now

      “During training camp, seven players, including Mike Singletary, Steve McMichael, Keith Van Horne and rookie William Perry, were either unsigned or holding out due to their contracts. Perry, McMichael and Van Horne eventually reported to training camp. Perry held out until August 5, when he signed a four-year, $1.35 million contract. However, after an unimpressive showing at training camp, defensive coordinator Buddy Ryan tabbed Perry as a “wasted draft-pick”.[8] Before the team’s season opening game against the Tampa Bay Buccaneers, players Al Harris, Todd Bell and Richard Dent requested to be traded. Dent and the Bears had been attempting to work out a contract extension, as his contract ran through the 1985 season, and paid him $90,000. Bell played for $77,000 the year before, and made the 1985 Pro Bowl roster, but asked for $950,000 annually, which would have made him the highest-paid player on the team. Bell and Harris would eventually hold out for the season.” – Wiki

      • KentuckyBearsFan

        that’s enough analysis for me.

        Looking at the Lions, maybe there is a correlation. A VERY negative one.

      • Irish Sweetness

        McMahon would come last on their long runs to open camp. Fuck preseason.

    • John F

      There is a correlation regarding preseason “results”, just not the final scores of the games. If your first team offense can’t consistently move the ball in the preseason (***cough***2017 Bears***cough***) then you will likely be in for a bad year …. as evidenced by the 2017 Bears.

      So if the #1 offense looks incompetent in the preseason (despite it being a new offense), 2018 will likely be a repeat of 2017.

    • I don’t know a full analysis, but I know the 2008 Lions went 4-0 in the preseason and 0-16 in games that matter, so I’m guessing no. The outcome of preseason games isn’t what matters at all.

  • John F

    “So let’s all agree to at least wait until preseason games to convince ourselves that our favorite lesser player has used the offseason to turn himself into a star.”

    Can we please stop this persistently incorrect line of thinking that states that players who were bad/mediocre/average as rookies or second-year players somehow magically become good players the following year as the “game slows down” and they “now know how to be a professional”, etc.

    This doesn’t happen in the vast, vast majority of instances and to keep promoting this farce only gives people false hope year after year. A player is good or he is not – from the get go. They may make marginal improvement the next year but to see a huge “jump” is hardly ever seen.

    • KentuckyBearsFan

      Amari Cooper is good.

      Kevin White is not.

      • AlbertInTucson

        Amari Cooper was a HUGE disappointment last season.

        • KentuckyBearsFan

          really? I didn’t know.

          • AlbertInTucson

            He had a nice rookie year but had a sophomore slump in Oakland.

          • SC Dave

            Well, the TD notwithstanding (in some ways a team stat), it was worse than any season Alshon started for the Bears.

          • SC Dave

            Oh, I meant Super Bowl Champion Alshon.

        • John F

          Ryan Pace would give his left nut for a receiver that had Cooper’s line of: 48 rec, 680 yds, a 14.2 avg and 7 tds

      • John F

        Deshaun Watson is good

        Mitch Trubisky is not

        • KentuckyBearsFan

          Watson was hurt.

          Trubisky had Fox.

          • John F

            There is always an excuse for why Bears players don’t acheive … always …

        • Sensible Sports Fan

          Truthfully, no one yet knows if either player is good or not. Too small a sample size from both of them. Settle down…

          • willbest

            Watson was good when he was playing. We will see if his knees last.

          • Sensible Sports Fan

            It was four games. He had four good games. That’s a nice little hot streak, but it also doesn’t predict his NFL future. Remember RGIII’s rookie season? He had a full season with a damn good passer rating. Tell me how his career went? Flash in the pan, that’s how.

            Again, too early to say that Watson is good. He had good results for four games that had a LOT to do with his teammates around him. Is he a good QB? That’s to be determined…

          • willbest

            Waston had the “it” factor in College, and he still had it at the pro level. Who knows if he will return to form or if it has destroyed his confidence.

          • Sensible Sports Fan

            “It” Factor? Sorry, I thought we were having a rational discussion about QB talent and skills. Can we leave the media diatribe and buzzwords out of the discussion?

          • willbest

            Pose, the will to win, leadership. Traits that you want in a QB above and beyond raw throwing ability.

          • Sensible Sports Fan

            Yea, lots of QBs show leadership. Trubisky is showing it in spades. But “it” factor isn’t a really sound way to really evaluate if an NFL QB can play the game at the NFL level consistently over a career now, is it? You know what I saw from Watson? I saw a QB that couldn’t put the ball where he wanted to nearly enough. I saw poor accuracy and putting the ball in harms way. I saw a QB make some bad throws that his all-pro WR bailed him out on and made the box-score look good. I saw a WR hitting uncovered WRs 40 yards downfield, not fully in-stride but it didn’t matter because Fuller was so damn open a high school QB could make that throw. He had good RESULTS. I didn’t see TRAITS that lead to consistent QB play at the NFL level.

            Again, it was four games of very good results, but the traits leading to those results didn’t scream “future NFL all-pro QB” to me. I need to see more from him, and from Trubisky, and from Mahomes.

            It’s far too early to tell if any of these kids will be star NFL QBs. People saying otherwise are fooling themselves.

          • willbest

            Who is talking about a star? Watson will be a starting caliber QB in the NFL if his knee returns to form and he doesn’t get any more ACL tears. He sees the field better than Mitch. Now if his knee doesn’t return to form then he is going to be RGKnee because he won’t be a run threat.

            Mitch Trubisky is in desperate need of taking a giant step forward in pretty much every metric if he wants to be anything other than a backup in this league. The only reason people aren’t panicked is because we just watch Goff get resurrected when a coach in retirement got replaced with somebody that gives a crap.

          • John F

            Will? You just told me that guys make huge leaps after year one, it happens all the time, why are you so uncertain with Trubisky?

          • willbest

            Just spitballing here, but it seems to me there is a pretty big gap between rare and all the time.

            And I am not counting Trub out so much as pointing out Watson already showed he belonged in the NFL

          • John F

            Sorry, just frustrated.

            A lot of people around here think when I say “rare” that I mean “never”. If I meant never, I would have said never.

          • Johnnywad

            Then perhaps you should stop being so hyperbolic every time you post something. When a guy like you posts something like “vast, vast majority”, given your history, well that’s right next door to “never”. Then you follow it up with “hardly ever seen.” So what do you expect? Because that sounds nothing at all like “happens sometimes” or “happens for quite a few in the NFL every year” or “is very common for young NFL quarterbacks given their own testimony, their coach’s testimony, and all empirical evidence, ever”, which would be a more commonly accepted viewpoint amongst reasonable football fans.

          • SC Dave

            I just need Mitch to improve on the “pinpoint accuracy” Nagy references.

          • John F

            I just need Mitch to improve on the “pinpoint accuracy” Nagy references.

            Don’t worry, 2018 is Mitch’s HUGE JUMP YEAR !!!!!!!

          • SC Dave

            There is no question that Watson was more ready for the NFL than Trubisky.

          • So you’re arguing that the “IT” factor doesn’t matter?
            It mattered so much, that’s it even earned it’s own phrase – the IT factor.

            The “It” factor doesn’t mean the player has to be rah-rah Favre type. Just means that they possess a certain je ne sais quois that demands respect and even adoration.

            As such, it elevates everyone around them.

            You follow BraveHeart into hell.
            OTOH, Bob from accounting can go fuck himself.

          • KentuckyBearsFan

            Glennon had the Shit factor.

          • John F

            He just needed another year to go from bad to good ……..

          • Johnnywad

            No, see he’s already been in the league for years. In fact, he’s been a starter. So enough time has passed for him to acclimate to the league and it didn’t go well.

            I’ll send you some graphs and charts to help you sort this out. Just simply reply here with your email address.

          • AlbertInTucson

            Well you can’t say “Shit’ without “it”.

          • Irish Sweetness

            Take Hopkins/Fuller away from Watson and give him say, our receivers last season ….

          • Johnnywad

            He’s be washing cars this afternoon.

        • Irish Sweetness

          DW had more experience. We’ll see how Biscuit does this season.

          • Watson was like a shot of adrenaline to that team though. No one can argue that. He rescued that O, made Hopkins and Fuller dangerous again.

            Trub came in, and it was a rusty trombone ( a lot had to do with Fox).

            Watson def had that “IT” – but charisma doesen’t prevent your knee from exploding.

    • Johnnywad

      I think we’ll just stick with it since you’re the only human that feels this way.

      • SC Dave

        Because Tom Brady sucks.

        • Johnnywad

          Right.

          And the players themselves say repeatedly that the game slows down and things get easier with experience allowing them to play better, practice differently and ultimately improve as players.

          I think he’s just trolling me. He can’t really believe this.

          • SC Dave

            Possibly, although people believe all sorts of stupid things. Look at the clowns that have been reelected POTUS the last three times.

            Shit, look at ME hoping (Super Bowl Champion) Shea might pan out for us.

          • leftcoastdave

            Nagy said exactly that about Kush who he had a couple of years back in KC.

          • Johnnywad

            True. But what does Nagy know about it relative to the musings of John F.?

        • John F

          Tom Brady is the answer to every “why can’t my 4th, 5th, 6th, 7th” round pick be good. The fact that there is only one guy like that out of several thousand drafted in the last 20 years kinda proves my point.

          If I am wrong there should be dozens (if not hundreds) of players who started out average and became good after year one.

          • “Modestly” Huge Bears Penis

            Maybe you should do a little research. There are dozens of players that started out average

          • John F

            I never said it is impossible, I said it was “rare”. The fact that people can throw out a guy here and there, maybe one or two each year proves my point.

          • “Modestly” Huge Bears Penis

            “If I am wrong there should be dozens….” So if there are dozens out there then you are wrong, simple logic.

          • Johnnywad

            What about more than dozens? How many do we need before it becomes more than dozens? Or is that always a thing after you get to 24?

          • Johnnywad

            A guy here and there…… people are just stacking names that pop into their brain in five seconds as they read this. It’s because there are so many.

            Just say you were wrong and that you’ll subscribe to my newsletter, and all is well.

          • Maybe he meant that good players “flash” greatness right away.
            I could kinda see that argument.
            When Lach played, he did shit that made us say “wow” right off the bat.
            When Timu played, kinda just shrugged our shoulders

            But players can def improve. I think half the league’s starting C/OGs are mid-rounders or lower.

          • Johnnywad

            Players get better all the time at every level. It’s just a strange position to take.

          • willbest

            Antonio brown was a 6th round pick I believe.

          • JAB

            Antonio Brown, Brandon Marshall, Darren Spoles and many others.

          • John F

            Three out of a few hundred drafted/UDFA each year.

          • leftcoastdave

            Kurt Warner, Cam Meredith . . .

          • willbest

            Oh right, your starting LT is a 7th rounder

          • John F

            Fine, I give up, half the guys drafted in the NFL each year go from being average to really good after one year. It happens all the time.

          • Johnnywad

            It’s less than half. But it happens. And it isn’t rare.

          • Johnnywad

            Yet was drafted in the sixth round. Explain that.

      • John F

        1. The situation you describe is a very rare occurrance

        2. Many of those players came from “small” schools, and there are a handful (less than a half dozen) of “good” players each year that come from those schools. They did not become good after joining training camp, they were already good and overlooked by scouts.

        3. Scouting is a very imprecise science and there is a bias towards kids from large schools, often so a GM can cover their ass. That’s why the guys in your group weren’t “top picks”.

        • Johnnywad

          Well, you’re saying one of two things:

          Either, 1.) They were good but NOBODY could see it. Which is the same thing as being not good.
          2.) That it is more likely they were good; and despite the machinery that is college and Pro scouting, which is pretty fucking serious business, they were flat out missed, than that they just simply got better through experience, training, maturation, and practice.

          I’m going to fervently disagree.

          • John F

            I will also agree to disagree. But I believe:

            1. That scouts like to remain employed and it is human nature to rate a guy from a big school higher than a small school when everyone else is doing it, herd mentality and all that,

            2. It is really hard to grade a guy who has D1 talent but due to grades, SAT score, etc, ends up at a small school and dominates. He is playing against lesser talent, not D1 guys.

          • Johnnywad

            When was the last time grades kept a legit football player out of a D1 school?

            Answer: Never.

        • leftcoastdave

          Kurt Warner was bagging groceries at the Hy Vee in Iowa and he is just the most well known example. Many others go from UDFA to signing nice contracts like Cam Meredith and I would put money on Toliver doing the same. Adam Shaheen will be ten times better this year, both because he has leaned out and he will be used in a system which knows how to use him.

          Sorry, many of us will happily wait and have our expectations fulfilled, others will just toss wet blankets.

          • John F

            I hope you are right, I truly do ……..

      • “Modestly” Huge Bears Penis

        That’s not true Button Shoes is the other moron that feels that way.

        • Johnnywad

          It seems like it should fit. But BS has never complained about this. His stance is different. It’s “Every Bear sucks always.”

  • “Modestly” Huge Bears Penis
    • John F

      I guess if you are 6’7″ and 335lbs you are likely to get a job playing football somewhere

    • Dammnit. Jay needs to guest call one of the Raven games.

      • “Modestly” Huge Bears Penis

        Why? He signed with the Colts….

        • Ah, didn’t care enough to read. Just looked at the pic, and figured the Ravens re-signed him for a bag of stale cheetos

    • ButtonShoes

      Of course the Colts signed him. They’re still all in on letting Andrew Luck getting killed behind that offensive line.

  • KentuckyBearsFan

    from Jeff’s twitter: “Trubisky is going to do all the intangible, marketable off-field stuff fans hated Cutler for not doing. He’ll say and do all the right things. ”

    I don’t care what he does in his spare time, unless it involves auditing the Federal Reserve and bringing peace to the Middle East.

    • SC Dave

      In that order. Audit The Fed!

    • willbest

      He could tell reporters to suck his dick as long as he is putting up 300 yards and a 3:1 TD:INT ratio on Sunday. You only need those intangibles when you aren’t doing your job.

  • KentuckyBearsFan

    Mitchell Trubisky grew up in an suburb outside of Cleveland. He went to college in Raleigh. He is now playing professional football in Chicago.

    Considering he is a transplant and a young adult, expecting any community service he does in Chicago for the Bears to be anything more than a public relations op would be mistaken because where he has grown up to date, is not local.

    Doesn’t mean he doesn’t care about people everywhere, just that….he’s a young kid. He can be a role model and figurehead, but not more than that.

    So I don’t care what he does in his spare time as far as community service or community relations compared to Jay Cutler. It doesn’t matter. It’s not his job.

    • Johnnywad

      Not sure what angle this sentiment is coming from.

      But Cutler was always in Children’s Hospitals and doing feel good community service work. He just didn’t need a ribbon for every showing.

      • KentuckyBearsFan

        I’m going by Jeff’s twitter. I never had any issue with Jay off the field.

      • KentuckyBearsFan

        But almost no rookie would have done what Watson did, donating his first paycheck to Houston after the hurricane and flooding.

        And it didn’t seem like a PR stunt when he did it.

        • Johnnywad

          Love that. He seems like a great kid, well, man at this point. I’m just doubtful he has the frame and accuracy to stand up to the NFL.

          • KentuckyBearsFan

            yeah, there’s only one Russell Wilson, which is who he reminds me of.

          • Watson is not NEARLY as accurate as Wilson.

            Wilson looked like a 10yr pro as a rook. 64% comp, and they didn’t run a mickey mouse O or had Hopkins and Fuller bailing him out.

            But Watson could def run, and he did seem accurate in the clutch, which was always the book on him and how he beat Bama twice.

      • yeah, he was always lo-pro on it. I think one of the beat writers actually outed him in one of his donations cuz he was tired of hearing how terrible he was.

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